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5 Search Results for: batida

We’ve got the Rio fever – come order a Batida!

If you’re anything like us, you’re thoroughly enjoying the sporting enthusiasm which has come with the Olympic Games. Whether gymnastics, athletics or the more unusual sports (Race walking? Trampolining? They’re legit olympic sports!), it’s hard not to swept up in Rio 2016 fever. And the best way to immerse yourself in the games culture? With a Brazilian cocktail!

If you’ve never experienced a Batida, then what are you waiting for?? Naturally it contains the Brazilian national drink cachaça, which is then blended into a boozy delight with condensed milk (oh yes) and cane sugar. If this doesn’t sound luscious enough, you can then add your choice of flavours – ours are strawberry, passionfruit, pineapple and coconut.

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Little fun fact for you – In Portuguese batida means shaken or milkshake, and the word also means a crash, usually used when referring to a car crash. This refers to the blended nature of the drink.

They’re fruity, they’re icy-cold, they’ve got a delicious sweetness to them – and they’re the perfect accompaniment for all this Rio excitement. Just come ask us to whizz you up a batida today.

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Filed under: cocktails

Delicious Batidas at El Camion!

Batidas aren’t something you’ll find on every cocktail menu, which is a shame because they are damn tasty. They are also noted as a good remedy to cure a fiery stomach if you’ve been on the sauce the night before. Sweet, creamy and blended with ice, Batidas are a treat of a cocktail – and that’s why we’ve dedicated a whole section of our menu to them.

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Batida means ‘shake’ in Spanish and typically refers to a milkshake. In Portuguese it means the same, except when referring to a road accident, where it is usually used to describe a car crash. Not to confuse (or mix) the two.

A drink originating from Brazil, Batidas are made with Brazil’s national spirit, cachaça – which can be replaced with vodka where cachaça is not available, but that would be a little like sacrilege. Cachaça is known as Brazilian rum, as, like rum, it is made from fresh sugar cane juice that is fermented and distilled.

The cachaça is mixed with fruit juice or coconut milk, cane sugar and, ideally, condensed milk to make it creamier, and then blended with ice. It is served in a tall glass. With an umbrella if you like.

An umbrella always looks good

An umbrella always looks good

At El Camion we use Sagatiba Cachaça, an ultra-premium silver cachaça that has a smooth sweetness, making it perfect for cocktails. The sugar cane used is hand-selected in fields near the Sao Paulo distillery and is pressed within 24 hours of cutting. Fresh spring water is added and it is then distilled five times, resulting in a clean, sweet spirit. The tasting notes are at first sugary and intoxicating, then mellow out into velvety, caramel flavours.

Sagatiba Cachaça

Sagatiba Cachaça

Our Batida menu:
Coconut Batida

Sagatiba Cachaca, cane sugar, coconut cream and condensed milk. Blended.

Strawberry Batida

Sagatiba Cachaca, cane sugar, strawberry and condensed milk. Blended.

Passionfruit Batida

Sagatiba Cachaca, cane sugar, passion fruit puree and condensed milk. Blended.

Pineapple Batida

Sagatiba Cachaca, cane sugar, fresh pineapple and condensed milk. Blended.

Peach Batida

Sagatiba Cachaca, cane sugar, peach liqueur and condensed milk. Blended.

El Camion – keeping you cool when summer comes

Sometimes, when you really stop and think about it, parts of the world just don’t make sense. Such as why do so many people fancy Harry Styles when his hair looks like he fell asleep and a badger nested in it, and why do people in some of the world’s hottest countries eat spicy, chilli-laced food? Surely they should be all about the ice creams rather than curries, salsas and peppers?

Well, El Camion can reveal that eating spicy food is actually a rather good way of keeping your temperature down. Yep, as the sun makes a more permanent appearance in our lovely London town, there will be call to cool down – and a bit of fiery hot sauce might be just what you need. The reason people from Central and South America lace things with chilli? Well, because it makes you sweat, and so this naturally cools you down more!

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Ok, so it’s tempting to grab something cold like iced tea or a lollypop – but beware, as this will cool your internal temperature too rapidly, and your body will end up compensating by raising your temperature. So that Magnum you thought was such a good idea will actually make you more hot and bothered. Alternatively, eating spicy foods works to raise your internal temperature and makes your blood circulation increase, which in turn makes you sweat and, when the moisture has evaporated, you’ve cooled off. Want to know the scientific term? Because naturally there is one. Yep, those beads on your forehead just after you’ve chowed down on a particularly jalapeñ-heavy enchilada is called ‘gustatory facial sweating‘.

So there we go. Now summer is here, if you find yourself a little too clammy for comfort then come and order a taco and then dare yourself to our wall of hot sauce.

Definitely accompany it with a chilled batida though – a heavenly cocktail of cachaça mixed with fruit juice or coconut milk, cane sugar and, ideally, condensed milk to make it creamier, and then blended with ice. Now that’s the best of both worlds…

The Glorious Daiquiri

You come to El Camion, you know that you are going to get a mean Margarita. You may also have been tempted by our cool, creamy Batidas. But there is one other cocktail from the Latin Americas that we do and we do very well, and that is the glorious Daiquiri.

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The Daiquiri is thought to have been invented, or at least developed, in the late 1800s by an American mining engineer called Jennings Cox, who worked in an iron mine in Cuba called Daiquiri. Apparently, the locals drank rum with limes and, to make it more appealing to his palate, he sweetened the drink with sugar and mixed it with ice, when he could get it.

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Whatever the history, the drink has been a favourite in American bars since the 1940s and it has a league of famous fans, including the late Ernest Hemingway, who loved it so much that there is a variation named after him. It is one of the six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks, which features the formula that our very own Dick Bradsell follows, and in turn, taught Simon Difford of Difford’s Guide.

In our Daiquiris we use Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, one of the most prestigious light Cuban rums available. It is a great quality rum and is perfect to mix in cocktails, without losing the authentic Cuban taste.

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Here is our list of Daiquiris:

Daiquiri Natural

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, fresh lime and cane syrup, fine strained and served straight up. The original Cuban Daiquiri.

Frozen Daiquiri

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, fresh lime, cane syrup and maraschino, blended with ice. Very refreshing on a hot day, and very, very drinkable.

Hemingway Daiquiri (Papa Double)

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, grapefruit and maraschino, available blended or straight up like Hemingway used to like it.

Daiquiri Deluxe

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, fresh lime, fresh pineapple and orgeat, blended with ice. Luxurious.

Strawberry Daiquiri

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, fresh lime, strawberry and liqueurs, blended. Everyone’s favourite – summertime in a glass.

Banana Daiquiri

Havana Club 3 Year Old Rum, fresh banana, creme de banane and cream, blended with ice. A totally tropical treat.
Winter is just about over. We make that Daiquiri Time.

 

Cocktails and late night tortillas in our Pink Chihuahua Bar!

Top tacos, banging burritos and gnarley nachos – El Camion Mexicano is all over it. Our Soho restaurant is the place to come to get your fill of the tastiest Mexican grub this side of the Atlantic. But, get this. Not only do we have awesome chefs in our kitchen, we also have some of the most talented bartenders in London behind our bar.

The Pink Chihuahua, our basement Baja bar, is where the magic happens and our skilled and knowledgable bar team are led by cocktail legend Dick Bradsell, the inventor of the Espresso Martini, no less.

Dick Bradsell's Espresso Martini Cocktail

Dick Bradsell’s Espresso Martini Cocktail

Here, you will experience the craftmanship of our passionate bar team and choose from an array of margaritas (try a mango one for something deliciously different) or one of our creamy batidas – or ask one of the guys to create a cocktail for you based on your preferences and tastes. Of course, our famous house cocktail is the Pink Chihuahua – sweet, fruity with a foamy layer on top, it is the perfect party drink.

The Pink Chihuahua is also the proud home of hundreds of tequilas and we welcome you to try any you fancy. This is a bar passionate about Mexico’s native tipple, tequila, and we have a whole menu at your perusal. We are also big fans of mezcal and we list 15 variations on our drinks list.

Our basement Baja bar is party central and we love hosting events down there – there is a booking policy but we welcome people to drop by or call up for a chat to see if we can accommodate. If you love our food and our unique party spirit, you’ll feel at home here – plus it’s open until the wee hours AND you can order food until 2am. Sweet!