top of the menu background

Inside our new cocktail menu…

If you’re yet to try out our new cocktail menu in the Pink Chihuahua, then you’re in for a treat! Love tequila? Love classic cocktails? Love wanky bartender drinks? This is so your bag…

image

The new menu is based on the Dick and Jane books, the old children’s series, and pays homage, in a small way, to  our dear friend, Dick Bradsell.

image

If you love tequila, we’ve got a wonderful selection of our favourite tequila cocktails…

imageAnd you’ll also find a few of Dick’s most famous creations.

 


image

Then, of course, there are the drinks that we love making and drinking – even though they might be a bit… wanky.

image

Finally, if you’re here for the tequila, we’ve got a couple of pages dedicated to the ones we like best. We’ve also got a page of different mezcals if you’re feeling smoky and mysterious.

image

This is just a small peek into what we’ve got going on, so come and discover the rest for yourselves. So far, the Mezcal Sazerac has got the cocktail aficionados a little excited – why not start there if you’re looking for an exciting jumping off point?

We’ve got the Rio fever – come order a Batida!

If you’re anything like us, you’re thoroughly enjoying the sporting enthusiasm which has come with the Olympic Games. Whether gymnastics, athletics or the more unusual sports (Race walking? Trampolining? They’re legit olympic sports!), it’s hard not to swept up in Rio 2016 fever. And the best way to immerse yourself in the games culture? With a Brazilian cocktail!

If you’ve never experienced a Batida, then what are you waiting for?? Naturally it contains the Brazilian national drink cachaça, which is then blended into a boozy delight with condensed milk (oh yes) and cane sugar. If this doesn’t sound luscious enough, you can then add your choice of flavours – ours are strawberry, passionfruit, pineapple and coconut.

Screen Shot 2016-08-11 at 14.13.37

Little fun fact for you – In Portuguese batida means shaken or milkshake, and the word also means a crash, usually used when referring to a car crash. This refers to the blended nature of the drink.

They’re fruity, they’re icy-cold, they’ve got a delicious sweetness to them – and they’re the perfect accompaniment for all this Rio excitement. Just come ask us to whizz you up a batida today.

Image from photosforfoodies.com

lead image www.smh.com.au

 

Filed under: cocktails

The Fancy Boiler Maker: An introduction

First off, what the H is a Boilermaker?

If you’ve ever been to the States, you might be familiar with the old shot and a chaser – typically a whisky and a beer. Well, that, friends, is actually called a Boilermaker.

Our one, however, is Fancy. That’s because it’s a gorgeous shot of Olmeca Altos Blanco Tequila served with a Michelada (more info on one of those here) made with the famous Mexican beer, Pacifico.

Down the shot, chase it with the Michelada for a punchy kickstart to the eve, or sip on both alternately for the perfect summer refresher.

You’ll find the Fancy Boiler Maker in the Wanky Bartender Drinks section of our new menu and it’s just £5 throughout July.

image

£5 Cocktail: The Toreador!

Before the Margarita became the tequila-sipper’s drink of choice, another boozy tipple was making a name for itself among agave aficionados. This, friends, was THE TOREADOR!

image

First mentioned way back in 1937 in the ‘Cafe Royal Cocktail Book’, this delicious concoction of Reposado Tequila, Apricot Brandy and freshly squeezed lime juice predates the margarita’s first appearance in the history books by sixteen years.

Our new head barman Will Hawes is bringing this awesome cocktail back as the first of our £5 monthly specials. He follows Simon Difford’s classic recipe:

2 shots of Reposado Tequila (100% agave!)
1 shot of Apricot Brandy
1 shot of freshly squeezed lime juice

 

Enjoy now at El Camion for just five round shiny ones!

 

Forget Chocolate Easter Eggs – it’s all about Cascarón!

Happy Easter everyone! We’re feeling full of the joys of spring (counteracted by the lingering hangover from a Bank Holiday Weekend), but while for many of you Easter Sunday involves scoffing as much chocolate as you possibly can, we have another option for you.

Have you ever heard of Cascaróns? No? Well that’s a shame, because they’re beautiful. Take a look:

Screen Shot 2016-03-27 at 16.04.02

In Spanish, cáscara means shell and cascarón means eggshell. Cascaróns are mostly used in Mexico during Carnival, but this craft is also a popular Easter tradition.

Here’s some more details from Hispanic Culture Online:

“According to historians, this Mexican craft actually originated in China. In the Far East, the colored eggs were filled with scented powders and frequently given as gifts, that is how they became part of Hispanic culture.

After Marco Polo visited China in the 13th century, the eggs became all the rage in the royal courts of Europe, especially in Italy and Spain. They finally arrived in Mexico in the mid-1800s, courtesy of the Emperor Maximilian’s wife Carlotta.

In Mexico, the cascarones tradition began to evolve. Instead of scented powder, Mexicans put confetti into the eggs. They then developed the tradition of cracking the egg over a friend’s head to release the confetti, which inspired the name cascarones or “shell hits.”

Many people believe that breaking cascarones over your friends’ heads brings a shower of good luck and good fortune along with the spill of confetti. Sometimes we also say you should make a wish before attempting to gently bump the egg on your friend’s head. If the egg breaks, your wish will be granted.”

So there you go – Easter eggs don’t have to be all about chocolate… get decorating, break some eggs with friends, and start making your wishes for spring!

Screen Shot 2016-03-27 at 16.06.28

 

Fancy a Quickie? El Camion can help with that…

Introducing the El Camion Quickie – a perfect opportunity to fuel up with a traditional Mexican snack, quench your thirst with a Sol, and add a spring in your step courtesy of Altos Tequila.

unnamed-77

Available weekdays from between 3 and 6pm, this deal is perfect for those industry bods that find themselves about to start work and, although they don’t want a full meal, would’t mind something speedy and satisfying. Or maybe you’ve just finished a shift and want to pop by to your favourite Baja Californian Cantina. For only that crumpled fiver in your pocket – or five shiny coins that you picked up as a tip – you can enjoy a freshly cooked Empanada, a chilled bottle of Sol, and a revitalising shot of Altos.

A truly fulfilling quickie for a fiver in Soho? Now that’s value!

Our Sexy New Tequila: FORTALEZA

Our tequila cabinet has a sexy new addition that has seduced our bar team already. It might be £9 a shot, but boy, is this something special.

Say ‘Hola’ to Fortaleza. Yep, it’s even enjoyable to say. But with a soft and sweet flavour, a creamy mouth-feel and a clean finish, it’s even more enjoyable to drink.

Fortaleza Tequila is crafted in the stone-milled estate of ‘Destileria La Fortaleza’ in Tequila, Jalisco. Made from 100% mature Blue Agave, Fortaleza is a family-produced artisanal tequila that is born out of heritage and passion, using old-style techniques. The outcome has blown tequila fans away – it tastes like pure class in a glass.

Tasting notes:

‘The blanco (silver) tequila is stored in stainless steel tanks and never touches wood, giving it a crystal clear appearance. It is smooth and floral with a creamy and delicate feel in the mouth. Fortazela Reposado (rested) is aged for six to nine months in charred oak barrels to give it a distinctive soft gold colour, and exudes warm nutty aromas with a lingering residual spice on the tongue. The Añejo (aged) tequila is aged for years in the charred barrels, giving a deep caramel colour, vanilla aroma and exceptionally smooth and velvety feel on the palate and throat.’

Enjoy like a fine wine and sip slowly. Tequila heaven.

 

image

 

Celebrating Octavio Paz

Today we’re celebrating the life and works of Mexican poet Octavio Paz – thought to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th Century, one of the greatest Hispanic poets of all time, and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1990.

Octavio Paz was born on March 31, 1914, in Mexico City. He was surrounded by literature and creative/political thinkers from a young age, and in 1933, he published his first collection of poems, Luna silvestre. Several years later, he helped found and edit a literary magazine called Taller. Over his lifetime, he produced more than 30 books and poetry collections, and often switched between prose and poetry. He died on April 19, 1998, in Mexico City, Mexico.

“listen to me as one listens to the rain,
the years go by, the moments return,
do you hear the footsteps in the next room?
not here, not there: you hear them
in another time that is now,
listen to the footsteps of time,
inventor of places with no weight, nowhere,
listen to the rain running over the terrace,
the night is now more night in the grove,
lightning has nestled among the leaves,
a restless garden adrift-go in,
your shadow covers this page.”
― Octavio Paz

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at 16.13.13

Tags: , , , | Filed under: Mexico

Valentine’s Day in Mexico

Well, before long it will be Valentine’s Day or, as they call it in Mexico, El Dia del Amor y la Amistad. This translates as ‘the day of love and friendship’.

And they have well and truly embraced this holiday, combining it with their own traditions and values of warmth and love. While Valentine’s Day is still a celebration of romantic love, it also serves as a day of appreciation of love as a whole. This means that as well as giving balloons, gifts and red roses to lovers, cards are also commonly presented to friends and family.

Although St Valentine does not specifically appear in Mexican history, the Mexica people did in fact have two deities that represented love.

Xochipilli was the god of love, games, beauty, dance, flowers, corn and songs. His name meant ‘prince of the flowers’ and he had a twin sister or wife; Xochiquetzal, which means precious flower or ornate bird. She was associated with the fertility of nature. Centeotl, the god of corn was their son.

In honor of this pair of gods, four days of fasting was observed. They sacrificed by inserting maguey thorns into their tongues and made offerings of bread and corn. They also danced to the beat of drums called teponaztli. Sounds far more interesting than just going out for dinner, that’s for sure!

Screen Shot 2016-01-23 at 16.58.51

Filed under: Mexico

£7.50 Lunch Deal!

Soho has got great food everywhere you turn, but for some reason come lunchtime you get overwhelmed by the choice, curl up in a ball and then beeline towards some overpriced chain sandwich shop for a sad, cellophane-wrapped carby parcel, complete with some dog-eared rocket poking out the sides.

 

THIS HAPPENS NO LONGER! WE ARE STOPPING YOU RIGHT THERE!

 

For the same price as that carby parcel with a drink, you can pick up a lunch deal from El Camion. YUMMY. We’ve got a sexy burrito for you, that comes with a side of tortilla chips and salsa. AND a soft drink.

 

image

 

Available Monday to Thursday, 12 noon until 5pm. VIVA LA LUNCHTIME!